Faculty Research Focus

Gregory Archer, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Ext Specialist – Breeder & Hatchery Management, Animal Welfare & Behavior
979.945.7658 garcher@poultry.tamu.edu
Research is focused in the areas of animal behavior/welfare and stress physiology. Research utilizes behavior
and physiological measures to investigate the effects of environmental conditions, nutrition, management
practices, and housing design on the health, production, and welfare of poultry. The primary goal of the
research is to investigate current practices, identify problem areas, and develop new methods to optimize
the production, health and welfare of poultry.

 

Giridhar Athrey, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor – Avian Genetics & Functional Genomics
979.458.9921 giri.athrey@tamu.edu
The main focus of our lab is to address fundamental questions relevant to genetics, evolution and conservation
of both domesticated and wild bird species. Research projects in our lab utilize field and experimental
studies coupled with genomic and computational tools to illuminate aspects of response to infectious dis-ease,
innate immunity and complex trait evolution in avian and other models. The broader implications of our
research includes the generation of knowledge and innovative tools for improving animal, human and
environmental health.

 

Christopher A. Bailey, Ph.D.
Professor – Poultry Nutrition
979.847.7352 c-bailey@tamu.edu
Research areas include actively seeking to reduce the environmental impact of poultry production primarily
by seeking improvements in nutrient utilization. Strategies include seeking improvements in ingredient
processing and feed manufacture, evaluation of alternate rearing/feeding strategies such a continuous
multiphase feeding, dietary incorporation of exogenous enzymes, use of probiotic materials such as mannan
oligosaccharides (MOS), and use of antibiotic like growth promoters.

 

Luc R. Berghman, Ph.D.
Professor – Immunology, Endocrinology & Transgenics
979.847.7387 berghman@poultry.tamu.edu
Research areas focus on acquiring fundamental new knowledge of the avian immune system and applying this
new knowledge toward the development of new immuno-biotechnological tools. Research projects include
the study of the immune response in the chicken, especially the function of antigen presenting cells (such as
the dendritic cells) in activating the humoral immune response and the development of chicken egg yolk
antibodies, monoclonal antibodies and recombinant antibodies for diagnostic, prophylactic and therapeutic
purposes.

 

John B Carey, Ph.D.
Professor – Production, Management
979.847.7344 jcarey@poultry.tamu.edu
Research areas include layer management, egg production and environmental stewardship. Past efforts have focused
on methionine sources and broiler excreta odor, fate of nitrogen in broiler production and nutrient buildup in broiler
litter and the role of dietary threonine on egg component yield, composition and functional qualities.

 

Craig Coufal, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Extension Specialist – Animal Waste & Litter Management, Air Emissions,
Hatching Egg Sanitation
979.845.2249 ccoufal@poultry.tamu.edu
Research areas focus on poultry waste management. Specific areas of investigation include litter and manure
management, odor control, plant nutrient utilization, pathogen reduction, ammonia emissions reduction,
composting of wastes and alternative waste management strategies.

 

Morgan Farnell, Ph.D.
Associate Professor – Avian Microbiology and Immunology
979.847.7363 mfarnell@tamu.edu
Over the past decade, Dr. Morgan Farnell’s internationally recognized research program has maintained
a primary focus on avian immunology, microbiology, and disease intervention. He has become one of the
foremost authorities in the U.S. for reportable disease outbreak responses in the commercial poultry
industry. Much of external funding in recent years has been received from federal sources in support of his
focus on reportable disease mitigation in commercial poultry, specifically mass depopulation and improved
cleaning and disinfection protocol development.

 

Yuhua Farnell, Ph.D.
Instructional Assistant Professor
979.847.7346 yfarnell@tamu.edu
Dr. Yuhua Farnell holds a majority teaching appointment in the department where she has responsibility for
teaching both undergraduate and graduate students. She is instructor of record for an undergraduate course
in Avian Anatomy and Physiology and a graduate course in Avian Physiology. She has also developed a graduate
molecular methods wet laboratory course that is cross-listed in the Departments of Poultry and Animal
Science. Dr. Farnell also holds a minor research appointment. Her areas of expertise include molecular
neurobiology, circadian clocks, and molecular markers for sex determination in avian embryos.

 

Audrey McElroy, Ph.D.
Professor & Extension Specialist – Intestinal Health
979.845.4310 Audrey.McElroy@ag.tamu.edu
Her research is focused on intestinal health and integrity with the objective to minimize the impact of enteric
pathogens on growth and performance in commercial broilers and turkeys. Goals are to investigate intestinal
mechanisms of immunity to pathogens and how they can be modulated by vaccination, dietary/nutritional
strategies, or other means to improve intestinal integrity during enteric disease challenge.

 

Sanjay Reddy, Ph.D.
Professor – Virology & Disease
979.458.0658 sreddy@tamu.edu
Research areas include poultry health with special emphasis on vaccines, and host-pathogen interaction. Specifically
the Marek’s disease virus with an emphasis in genomic/epigenetic regulation of Mareks disease virus
genes and the development of the Marek’s disease virus as a vaccine vector.

 

Rosemary L. Walzem, Ph.D.
Professor – Nutritional Biochemistry
979.847.7361 rwalzem@tamu.edu
Research is focused on fundamental and applied issues in lipoprotein biology in humans, poultry and other
comparative species. Research projects address basic mechanisms of yolk formation, functional qualities of
yolk-precursor lipoproteins and physiological factors within the hen that influence yolk formation. Research
related to human nutrition emphasizes those dietary factors and physiological processes that mitigate or initiate
atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD).

 

 

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